Chris Stover

Art Ensemble Syd

Chris Stover

Transplanted to New York City from Seattle, Chris Stover is a trombonist, composer, theorist, and full-time professor at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music, where he runs the music theory and composition program. He leads the groups Circle By Night, More Zero, the Helical Quartet, and the Caetano Veloso Project as well as the twelve-piece big band Book of Sand, and has performed recently with Django Bates, Darcy James Argue, Fred Ho, Eddie Palmieri, Sérgio Galvão, Pablo Menendez, Charlie Hunter, Jovino Santos Neto, Slavic Soul Party!, Samir Chatterjee, Alexis Cuadrado, Amanda Ruzza, Gregorio Uribe, Richard Boukas, Wayne Horvitz, Robin Holcomb, Tom Varner, Michael Spiro, Annea Lockwood, and many others, including especially Art Ensemble Syd. Chris spent many years as the go-to trombone player in the jazz, Afro-Cuban, and new music scenes in Seattle, and he appears on over sixty recordings, including critically acclaimed releases on OmniTone, Origin, and Sub Pop. A 2011 CD with the Q.E.D. Trio is available on Origin Records, new CDs with Circle By Night and More Zero were released in 2012 by More Zero Music, and new CDs with his Helical Quartet and the Caetano Veloso Project will be released in 2015.

Chris is in high demand as a teacher and scholar, and has given workshops and taught classes recently in Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Malawi, Australia, Israel, Denmark, and across the United States. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on Brazilian and Cuban music, music theory pedagogy, and music-philosophical subjects. In 2015 he will spend three months in Brazil as a Fulbright Teaching and Research Fellow.

Chris’s compositions explore process, growth, flux, and recontextualization, with careful and nuanced considerations of the relationships between melody and harmony and the ways these relationships can change over time. Even at his most aggressive and experimental there is still a delicate lyricism to his compositional and improvisational approach. A true musical polymath, Chris’s musical language absorbs and subtends a wide array of influences, including the entire history of jazz, various so-called “new musics,” nineteenth-century (and earlier) Western art music, Cuban and Brazilian melodic and rhythmic languages, Indian classical music, and much more.